One avocado a day helps lower ‘bad’ cholesterol for heart healthy benefits

One avocado a day helps lower 'bad' cholesterol for heart healthy benefits

Move over, apples — new research from Penn State suggests that eating one avocado a day may help keep “bad cholesterol” at bay. According to Penn State researchers, bad cholesterol can refer to both oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and small, dense LDL particles.

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Narcissism might be a dark trait but it can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression

Narcissism might be a dark trait but it can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression

People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be ‘mentally tough’, feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research led by Queen’s University Belfast has found.

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Here’s Why We Eat More When We’re With Friends And Family

Here’s Why We Eat More When We’re With Friends And Family

Going home from dinner out with a friend or a Sunday family lunch, you may notice you feel slightly more full than you normally do after eating. And while some of this may have to do with how many potatoes your mum insists you eat, new research seems to suggest that there could be something else going on. Researchers analysing dozens of past studies on the “social facilitation” of eating have confirmed that people do tend to eat more when eating in groups than alone — and have come up with several social and psychological mechanisms that could explain our increase in consumption in company.

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Google searches on ‘anxiety’ accurately indicate when and where people are feeling anxious, study finds

Google searches on 'anxiety' accurately indicate when and where people are feeling anxious, study finds

Google searches for anxiety appear to accurately reflect population-level anxiety, according to new research published in the journal Emotion. “I am interested in the potential of big data analysis in illuminating the cultural influence on human minds. I think this type of analysis is especially useful to study questions that are difficult to study otherwise,” said study author Takeshi Hamamura, a senior lecturer at Curtin University in Australia.

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